The Best Tips On Making Positive Life Changes When Your Kids Leave Home

The Best Tips On Making Positive Life Changes When Your Kids Leave Home

 

Kian here, today we have a guest post from Jennifer Scott. It’s a great lesson and reminder that as we go thorugh life there are going to be big changes, and one of the biggest we go through is sending our kids out of the nest.

As my daughter is only 2 I have a while before that time, but it’s never too early to start learning and implementing good practices.

Enjoy and let me know what you think

-Coach Kian

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Photo via Pixabay by Maura24

It happens to all parents someday: the kids grow up, go off to college, and don’t need us as much anymore. This major life change can be a very sad time for many people; there’s even a term for it. “Empty nest syndrome” may not be a real illness, but it can certainly feel that way. For years, you make your children your priority, teach them, help them learn and grow, and then one day they move out, and you’re left with a lot of time on your hands.

“With due respect to my son’s feelings, I have the worst of it. I know something he doesn’t — not quite a secret, but incomprehensible to the young,” he wrote. “He is experiencing the adjustments that come with beginnings. His life is starting for real. I have begun the long letting go,” writes Michael Gerson of his son going off to college.

It’s okay to be sad about such a big change in your family dynamic, but it’s important to view this as a positive thing. What have you always wanted to do? Now is the time to think about your goals and make some changes for the better in your lifestyle, starting in your home. Not that you have to erase any sign that your child ever lived there, but once they move out, you can put your mark on your house and really make it your own. Create that hobby room you always wanted, or make a man-cave complete with a beer fridge. Whatever you choose to do, do it with the intention to better your life.

Here are a few tips on how to get started.

Clean up and rearrange

Now that the house is yours again, you can feel free to go through each room and de-clutter, clean up, and rearrange. Always wanted a home office? Make it happen. You might have to reorganize some things, but that’s a great way to start fresh and look through some old memories at the same time. Take those old photo albums and start scanning them in on your computer so you’ll have digital copies; get rid of anything you haven’t used in a year or more; donate items you’re tired of. Having a clean, well-organized home isn’t just good for your physical health, it’s great for your mental health, too. It’s hard to be at your best when your environment is cluttered, dark, and dirty, and it can actually have an effect on your sleep.

A great way to go about getting organized is to get your kids involved. Have them come over one weekend and go through boxes of mementos or closets filled with their old belongings. Make a night of it and order a pizza. Not only will this help you get through this transitional time emotionally, you’ll also have help moving boxes and other heavy items.

For more tips on how to declutter your space, read more here.

Work on your relationships

It may sound crazy, but having your kids out of the house could actually bring you closer together. When you live with someone and see them every day, you become accustomed to their presence. Spending some time apart will have you missing each other like crazy so that each time you see one another you’ll make it count.

Also, this is the perfect time to get closer to your spouse or significant other. As parents of children who lived at home, you were likely so busy that it was difficult to spend quality time together. Now is the time to work on your relationship and really get to know one another again.

Watching your child move on without you can be heartbreaking and overwhelming, but keep in mind that this doesn’t have to be a stressful time. Focus on the positive changes you can make during this transitional period.

Author: Jennifer Scott (SpiritFinder.org)